Fruit Storage Guide

Apples

Avocados

Berries & Cherries

Citrus

Grapes

Melons

Pears

Stone Fruit

Tropical & Specialty


PEACHES & PLUMS

Ripening Peaches and Nectarines
Store peaches and nectarines at room temperature until ripe — this usually takes 2 to 3 days. A ripe fruit will yield a bit when pressed gently. To speed up the ripening process, place nectarines or peaches in a paper bag and store at room temperature, out of direct sunlight. Storing ripe stone fruit in the crisper drawer will prolong its eating life — it should keep for up to a week when refrigerated.

Ripening Apricots
Apricots' texture, color, and juiciness improve as the fruit matures. Allow apricots to ripen at room temperature for 2 to 5 days; when the fruit is soft, it is ready to eat. Because apricots are quite fragile and will spoil quickly if bruised, they should be handled carefully. After apricots have ripened, pack loosely in a plastic bag, and they will keep for up to 5 days in the refrigerator.

Ripening Plums
Store plums at room temperature to ripen, check frequently because they are extremely perishable. A ripe fruit will yield when pressed gently. To speed up the ripening process, place plums in a paper bag and store at room temperature, away from direct sunlight. Storing ripe plums in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer will prolong their eating life — they should keep for 3 to 5 days.

Freezing Stone Fruit
Stone fruit takes well to freezing. First, peel the fruit: drop into boiling water for 30 seconds, plunge into cool water, then remove the skins. Slice open and remove the pits, which can impart bitterness to the fruit during freezing. Place in an airtight container and they will last for up to a year. Rolling stone fruit in sugar before freezing helps to preserve the shape.

Storing Cherries
Since cherries don't ripen after harvest and tend to spoil quickly, they should be stored in the refrigerator, where they will keep for several days. They tend to absorb the odors of other foods, so keep them stored separately. Wash cherries just before serving.

Freezing Cherries
To freeze whole or pitted cherries for long-term storage, wash, dry, and stem them, then place in an airtight container and freeze. You can also freeze them in syrup or a sugar pack. They will last for up to a year, and are excellent for pies, shakes, and ice cream.

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