Fruit Storage Guide

Apples

Avocados

Berries & Cherries

Citrus

Grapes

Melons

Pears

Stone Fruit

Tropical & Specialty


TROPICAL FRUITS

Carambola/Starfruit
The carambola has a foolproof ripeness indicator — the color of its ribs. The ribs are the pointy seams that give the carambola its star shape. If they're green, leave the fruit at room temperature for a few days until they begin to brown. Ripe carambolas can be stored in the refrigerator for about a week.

Cherimoya
Let cherimoyas ripen at room temperature until they just start to soften to the touch, about 2 to 3 days. Once ripe, refrigerate at once, since this fruit has a tendency to ferment when overripe. Ripe cherimoyas should keep in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.

Coconuts
You can keep whole coconuts anywhere — at room temperature, they should keep for 2 to 4 months. Store opened coconuts in an airtight container in the refrigerator, where they should keep for up to a week, or in the freezer, where they should keep for up to 9 months.

Figs
A ripe fig is slightly soft to the touch and lightly aromatic. Let figs ripen for up to 4 days at room temperature. Taste one as they soften, and if it's sweet, they should be ripe. Once the figs are ripe, refrigerate them — they should keep for a couple of days.

Guava
Once ripe, a guava will yield slightly when pressed and its skin will be yellow. Allow unripe guavas to sit for a few days at room temperature, or place in a paper bag to speed up the ripening process. Store ripe guavas in the refrigerator crisper, where they can keep for up to 4 days.

Kiwi Fruit
Let kiwis ripen at room temperature until they give a little when pressed gently. To hasten their ripening, place kiwis in a paper bag — adding an apple or banana to the bag will speed up the ripening even more. Once ripe, kiwis should be stored in the refrigerator, where they should keep for about a week.

Kumquat
Thin-skinned kumquats are more perishable than oranges and grapefruits. They should keep at room temperature for about 5 days, and in the refrigerator for about 3 weeks.

Lychee
Lychees are best when eaten soon after purchase. If you want to keep them for a week or so, wrap them in paper towels and store them in a perforated plastic bag in the refrigerator.

Mamey Sapote
Mamey sapotes have a nick near their stem that reveals their interior — if green shows through, the fruit is not ripe and should be kept at room temperature until it yields when pressed gently. Ripe sapotes can be stored in the refrigerator, where they should keep for up to 3 days.

Mangoes
A ripe mango will yield a bit when pressed gently and will emit a delicate fragrance. Unripe mangoes will lose their green complexion as they mature. At room temperature, it can take a green mango up to a week to ripen — you can speed this up by placing the fruit in a paper bag. Store ripe mangoes in the refrigerator, where they should keep for at least a week.

Medjool Dates Fancy
If you keep them refrigerated in an airtight container, dates will last up to a year.

Papayas
Judge a papaya's ripeness by touch and smell rather than looks. A ripe papaya will give when pressed gently, like a ripe avocado. If your papaya is not quite ripe, let it ripen at room temperature for a few days, turning it daily so that it ripens evenly. Once ripe, it should keep in the refrigerator for 1 or 2 days; beyond that, it will begin to lose flavor.

Passion Fruit
When the smooth skin of the passion fruit starts to look wrinkled and dimpled, the fruit is ripe and ready to be eaten. The seeds are also edible. Ripe passion fruit can be kept in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Pineapples
Once harvested, pineapples do not ripen further, so it is best to eat them soon after purchase. Letting then stand at room temperature for a day or two will decrease their acidity, but their sweetness will stay the same. Stored in a perforated plastic bag in the refrigerator, pineapple should keep for about 4 days.

Pomegranate
Your pomegranates will arrive ripe and ready to eat. They will keep for up to a week at room temperature if stored in a cool, dry place. For long-term storage, place pomegranates in the refrigerator, where they should keep for up to 2 months.

Prickly Pears
Soften prickly pears by letting them sit on the counter out of direct sunlight for a few days. After that they can be kept refrigerated for a week.

Quince
Ripen quinces at room temperature and they will reward you with a remarkable fruity-flowery fragrance as their skin turns from green to yellow. Quinces look tough but bruise easily, so to store them, wrap separately in plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator, where they'll keep for several weeks.

Persimmon, Hachiya
Some people prefer their Hachiya persimmons so ripe that they are soft enough to eat with a spoon, while others like them a bit firmer so that they can be sliced. Let hard Hachiyas ripen at room temperature for 5 to 10 days, then refrigerate, and they should keep for about a week. Place very ripe Hachiya persimmons on a plate and cover with plastic wrap before storing in the refrigerator.

Persimmon, Fuyu
This fruit is usually eaten when it is firm to the touch, but not rock hard. Let ripen at room temperature for a few days, and once ripe, store on a plate in the refrigerator. Fuyu persimmons should keep for about 4 days in the refrigerator.

Rhubarb
Rhubarb wilts quickly, so store it in the crisper section of the refrigerator, where it should keep for 2 to 3 days. For long-term storage, wash rhubarb, cut it into pieces, and place in an airtight container in the freezer, where it should keep for up to 9 months.

Sharonfruit
Unlike Hachiya persimmons, the non-astringent Sharonfruit variety of persimmon can be eaten when it is still slightly firm — or, if you prefer, you can wait and eat it when it reaches its full ripeness. Store at room temperature for few days until it reaches the softness that you desire. Ripe persimmons can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a month.



Click here to buy some tropical & specialty